Feature Friday #4

Friday is here, and with it another post in our Feature Friday series!  You can catch up with our previous posts HERE , HERE, and HERE .

Today we’ve chosen to highlight another of our personal favorite products, and one of the reasons we didn’t hesitate to make the jump into alpacas:  SOCKS!

If you were to ask any of us here on the farm what our #1 must have alpaca product would be ,I would be willing to bet you’d hear socks.

David and I bought our first pairs of alpaca socks from a fledgling alpaca farm over 16 years ago!  The price seemed high to us, but we wanted to help a local farmer out, so we each bought two $18.00 pairs of socks, and David grabbed a pair of glove liners.  Those socks were one of the best investments we’ve ever made!  David “retired” a pair of his socks about a year ago when they finally wore out in the heel.  He still wears the other pair on a regular basis.  I still have both of my pairs, but one is starting to look a little thin.  We didn’t care for them in any special way, we just threw them in the washer and dryer with our other laundry and went about our day.  The glove liners were in perfect condition right up until last year when David cut them while working on a fence.  Our $72.00 investment (not counting the glove liners) into what we thought were the most expensive socks we’ve ever owned, has turned out to be $4.50 a YEAR and counting.   Not too shabby for socks that have kept us comfortable and cozy for many a season.  We couldn’t believe a pair of  “luxury” socks could last that long, and actually do what we were told they would do.

Jump forward to today, and we are still amazed at our lowly little alpaca socks. They are cool in the summer, and warm in the winter.  They wick moisture away from the body better than any other socks I have owned.  They feel good on!   They don’t bunch up in my shoes and don’t rub my heel. Even after long days in hot weather they remain odor free.  They are durable, and easy to care for.  I still throw all of my socks in the washer and dryer.  No special care needed.    If you read our fiber facts post last week, you know all of this is due to the alpaca fiber itself.

I wear a pair daily, whether on the farm or in my “other” job.  My feet stay comfortable year round.  I have pairs that are great with my tennis shoes, muck boots, hiking boots, barn boots , dress socks, and just to lounge around the house in.  David has pairs specifically designated for hunting and fishing, and everyday wear.  Each one of the kids have a pair or two or twenty!

Our socks have come a long way since that fledgling alpaca farm sold us some!  We carry socks for every need and in multiple price ranges, colors, and styles.  We sell socks to runners, hikers, skiers, nurses, doctors, EMTs, office workers, construction workers, teachers, attorneys, and more!  They make an amazing gift for yourself or for someone special.  We’ve even had them featured in raffle prizes!

If you see us out and about, ask us about our socks!  If you’d like to grab your first pair, or you 50th pair, let us know and you can stop by the farm store.  If you’re not local, we’d be happy to send pictures of our stock and walk you through finding the right pair.

We proudly carry socks made in the US out of US alpaca fiber, but we also proudly carry socks made in Peru out of Peruvian fiber.  Socks aren’t one size fits all, and our supply shouldn’t be either.

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Categories: Alpaca, Basics, Feature Friday, fiber, Media, Pick TN, Products, Shop, Shop local, Shop Small | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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